Saturday, September 19, 2009

Getting Oracle Software

Where to get Oracle {product} software for { operating system }

Oracle makes most of their software available on the internet under one of several development licenses. This software is the same as you use in production. There are no time limits, and no functionality missing. What is usually missing is the ability to get support and patches.

PLEASE READ THE LICENSE TO WHICH YOU AGREE!

The software is available under either http://edelivery.oracle.com or http://download.oracle.com - follow the links for your favorite product and select the download for the operating system you want.

What about old versions, such as Oracle8i Database?

When Oracle stops supporting a product, they revoke the ability to download it. Then the only hope is to get a copy from Oracle Support (using your Support Identifier) or getting it from a friend. (Please note, I am not your friend when it comes to this! Don't bother asking.) I have seen copies available on eBay and other auction sites as well. In any case, you may have to pay for that. You may not be able to get it at all.

Occasionally Oracle maintains links to old software as part of a Metalink / MyOracleSupport document. For example, note 763603.1 links to the BEA WebLogic Server archive.

But be aware that old software will usually not work, or will not work well, on new operating systems. (Blog about that is coming.)

How about a new version for my platform? When will it be available?

Oracle recently released "Oracle Database 11g Release 2" and have made the Linux x86 and x86-64 available. As of today, it's not available for any other operating system.

There is a bit of a dilemma when it comes to releasing software for other operating systems. Part of that stems from customers wanting to be able to use the software. So Oracle needs to assign developers and testers to ensuring that the s/w is ready (sic).

Most Oracle employees are not allowed to discuss release dates. There are legal and Security Commission related reasons. Customers and partners who have access to release date information are usually under a non-disclosure agreement (NDA) and can not talk either. People without authorization could end up in court if they discuss release dates - so please don't ask.

Bottom line is that when it shows up in the Download area for your favorite operating system, there will be much rejoicing and you will likely see announcements in various forums.

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